Embers- Annabelle’s Curse

Updates On My Life (I know you’re all waiting with bated breath)!

Hello everyone! Sorry I’ve been absent lately. I have a lot going on with my life right now in regards to school, kerscorner, music, etc. etc. I have a lot of really amazing interviews that I will be posting over the next few weeks/months and I’m super excited for all of you to read them! Unfortunately, I have had to miss a few concerts recently (one of them being Warpaint, I really can’t talk about it without getting overly emotional) BUT I also have some great concerts coming up (think WET ((if you haven’t heard of them check them out))!

Aside from Kerscorner, I’ve been recording some of the songs I’ve written in the past and I’m having a really fun time with it! I’ve wanted to record some stuff for so long, so I’m really happy I’ve had the opportunity. I promise I will try to be around more, I’ve just been extraordinarily busy with midterms and everything else. You guys are the… (I was going to say raddest cats because I don’t like the phrase cool cats, but then I thought.. wouldn’t it be raddest rats… and that’s not fun, so I’ll leave it ambiguous)!

Here’s the song I recently recorded, “On The Road”! I wrote/recorded lyrics, vocals, guitar and bass!

My Q&A With: The Wild Reeds

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Amidst the chaotic and metropolitan environment of Southern California, The Wild Reeds channel positive attitudes while blending encouraging messages to create thoughtful folk rock songs. Originating as a trio in 2009, the band continues to grow. The three original members Sharon, Kinsey, and Mackenzie have maintained their roles as lead singers, providing golden cross-harmonies and silvery melodies with the backing of instruments such as guitar, banjo, and harmonium. In recent years, members Nick J. and Nick P. expanded the band’s sound with the addition of bass and percussion. The Wild Reeds have several things on the horizon, such as the upcoming release of their album Blind and Brave and a spot in the Way Over Yonder festival lineup- the west coast version of the Newport Folk Festival. With much to look forward to The Wild Reeds are a real threat in taking over the emerging music scene.

Sharon from the band answered some questions about what lies ahead for the group, here is what she had to say:

The band originally started as a trio and has since become a five-member group. How do you feel the band has benefited from this change?

Since becoming a five-piece, we’ve worked really hard to gel together in order to let the songs shine. It was important to find a rhythm section that would sit back when needed, so we could keep an emphasis on our harmonies. The great thing about have a bigger band is that we have much more to work with- more elements and layers. Our songs are now able to reach a higher potential and a literal higher decibel.

Where did the name The Wild Reeds come from?

The name “The Wild Reeds” came from an old fable called “The Oak and the Reed”. In the tale, a proud oak tree is surrounded by a field of reeds. The oak tree speaks down to the reeds because they bend and sway every time the wind comes. What the oak tree didn’t know was that they bend but do not break, and when a huge storm hit, the oak tree fell over. The fable teaches that you must have endurance, and especially to not be prideful. We’ve taken the story to heart and it’s sort of our main motto.

It is interesting to see a band with such a folky sound come from Southern California. Where do you feel the inspiration for your music has come from?

Our inspiration comes from all over. When it comes down to it, the folky sounds we are drawn to usually have an emphasis on the lyrics. The point of our songs is to connect and especially to let the emotions out that we feel. We’re inspired by honesty and vulnerability, and I think the folky sound is just so warm and bare that it compliments the lyrics well. 

The band is set to have an album release party at The Troubadour in West Hollywood. This must be very exciting. How does it feel to be releasing a new album and performing at such an iconic venue?

It feels so great! We actually have quite the soft spot for The Troubadour, as Kinsey and I (Sharon) actually met there about 5 years ago at a Lisa Hannigan concert. There really is a strong positive presence there and we are inspired whenever we play the room!   We are so amped to release Blind and Brave, it’s been burning a hole in our pockets. We’ve been putting in every effort to make August 9th a great one.

What can we expect from your upcoming album, Blind and Brave?

You can expect real, honest songs and anthemic ones. Having three songwriters, our tunes may have different styles and instrumentation, but it all flows together into one album. You can expect encouragement and heartache in the same song, usually ending on a positive note (no pun intended).

The sound the band creates has been compared to artists like Jenny Lewis and Fleet Foxes. How would you define your band’s sound?

We were on tour in the northwest once and we saw a singer-songwriter play a heart-wrenching and dramatic tune all acoustic at a house show. Our eyes got big and some of us cried (as we often do haha). It was heavy and from the core. We came up with (if it’s not already a thing) the genre known as “heavy folk”. It makes us laugh because it sounds something like a mash up of acoustic guitars and metalcore, but we’re just trying to present the best versions of our songs so that they hit home for us, and everyone listening. I think that Fleet Foxes do that really well. The powerful harmonies lift the songs to a new level. With Jenny, we love the determined yet casual attitude she gives off and of course her catchy, heart-felt tunes! We hope to be a memorable band like the two of them, and we are thankful for them paving the way for indie/pop/folk groups.

 

Let’s Talk About: Newport Folk Festival

photoDay one of the three day Newport Folk Festival has only just ended, but boy has it been a real treat. Having gone to Firefly Music Festival in June, it was an extraordinarily nice change of scenery. Fort Adams is the absolute perfect venue for a small, intimate festival, which is exactly what NFF is. The scale of attendees is around 10,000 people, with artists performing on a total of four stages. The ocean backdrop is absolutely stunning and the environment was surprisingly peaceful and calm, the antithesis of Firefly (lol sorry Firefly but you were cray). There are still two more days left, but I could hardly wait to talk about the festival to someone other than my family and friends, so voila.

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IMG_0284The headliner of the night was Ryan Adams, but for me the star was Jenny Lewis. She was absolutely phenomenal and sounded amazing live. Her outfit was pretty quirky and bizarre (a cape and Willy Wonka-esque glasses) which made me love her performance that much more. She began her set with her latest hit “Just One Of The Guys” and “Silver Lining” from her days with Rilo Kiley immediately following. I was sincerely hoping she would play “Silver Lining” but didn’t think she actually would, so that was an awesome surprise.

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I attended the festival with my sister who I hardly get to see, so that has been very nice. It has just been really incredible so far and I cannot wait for what is to come. Tomorrow- Jack White. P.S- Only true followers of KersCorner will realize that I am wearing my signature festival hat in the picture below. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. My motto.

Let’s Talk About: Stay Gold

resizeFirst Aid Kit’s latest studio album, Stay Gold, is full of the charm that has drawn listeners to the band since the beginning. The album certainly seems to be the moodiest, most melancholy, and most percussive album the band has produced thus far, yet it is undoubtedly one of the most mature sounding, a  reflection of how far the sisters have come.

Very rarely on this album does one hear the light and whimsical sounds of those heard in their earlier songs like “Emmylou.” Rather, the songs seem to capture a heavier sound. Even the more charming songs, such as “Heaven Knows,” contain more pronounced musical accompaniment that differs from the light-folky sounds of earlier albums. The first four tracks, “My Silver Lining,” “Master Pretender,” “Stay Gold,” and “Cedar Lane” coincidentally happen to be my favorite four on the album. The writing on this album is also something that jumps out; the songs seem to be more personal and wholehearted.

I was supposed to attend the sisters’ concert the other day, but unfortunately could not attend at the last minute (tears for days). I imagine the presentation of this new album differs from the live performances from a few years ago for there seems to have been significant musical progression between this album and The Lion’s Roar and The Big Black and the Blue. By this, I definitely do not mean First Aid Kit has become a “better band,” because I never thought they needed improvement in the first place. Rather, I note that it seems that there has been advancement within as a band and as musicians from previous albums. Again, that sounds a bit like I am minimizing how spectacular their previous albums are, which I am not at all. What I mean to say is that First Aid Kit has come a long way since 2007. With each year and with each album they further solidify their position as a prominent band in folk music.